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George Romero is Incredulous

by Reverend_Danger   June 09, 2008 at 7:41PM  |  Views: 115

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George Romero - arguably the biggest names in zombie movies - is calling out the recent trend in "fast zombies" as completely ridiculous.  No word yet on how he feels about other fallacies in the noble art of zombie documentation.

You may have noticed when you were crawling out of the aisle and back into your seat that zombies have become a great deal more athletic recently.  28 Days/Weeks Later and I Am Legend are probably the two most recognized "fast zombie movies." It is totally terrifying, which is what a zombie movie should be.

Romero, though, errs on the side of the realist zombie movie-makers[sic].  He doesn't think they would be physiologically capable of running.  NWANews reports:

"Their ankles would break," is Romero's stand. "It doesn't make sense to me." He sets things straight with a, well - running joke in Diary of the Dead. Live people discover they have some advantage over the rotted, just in being able to hustle their heels. "The dead move slowly," Romero directs. "But they keep coming."

There's something admirable about 68-year old Romero sticking to his guns.  There's also something completely ludicrous about it.  Zombies can't run?  Really?  How about people can't be zombies?  That seems an even more apt criticism if we're getting into the physiology of it.  Stick to your guns, Romero, unless they are lead ball-firing muskets which only work in a dry heat.

Josh Levin at Slate says it best:

The creeping zombie column is an effective horror device both because it's a great visual and a good way to wring scares out of a low budget. But, as Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later proved, an independent film shot on digital video no longer needs the slow zombie crutch.

THE DAILY FOUR