11:50am
The Day After Tomorrow (2004): Day After Tomorrow, The (2004)
2:49pm
10,000 BC (2008)
5:21pm
Mission: Impossible (1996)
7:59pm
Lip Sync Battle: Mike Tyson vs. Terry Crews
8:29pm
Lip Sync Battle: Anna Kendrick vs. John Krasinski
8:59pm
Lip Sync Battle: Anne Hathaway vs. Emily Blunt
9:30pm
Lip Sync Battle: Justin Bieber vs. Deion Sanders
10:00pm
Lip Sync Battle: Victoria Justice vs. Gregg Sulkin
10:31pm
Lip Sync Battle: Stephen Merchant vs. Malin Akerman
11:01pm
The Day After Tomorrow (2004): Day After Tomorrow, The (2004)
2:00am
Final Destination 2 (2003)
9:00am
Gangland: Menace of Destruction
10:00am
Gangland: One Blood
11:00am
Gangland: Deadly Triangle
12:00pm
Gangland: Aryan Terror
1:00pm
Gangland: All Hell Breaks Loose
2:00pm
Gangland: Death Before Dishonor
3:00pm
Gangsters: America’s Most Evil : Thelma Wright
4:00pm
Gangsters: America’s Most Evil : Mother of the Avenues: Maria "Chata" Leon
6:30pm

Checkerboard Illusion Makes You See Two Different Colors

by Theta1138   August 18, 2011 at 12:00PM  |  Views: 1,501
Checkerboard Illusion Makes You See Two Different Colors


If there's one thing you think you know, it's color. No matter what happens, red is still red, blue is still blue, and pink is still a strange color for a dude to wear. And you'd be right...except sometimes not.



Go ahead, watch that video. Go on, we'll wait. Okay, we'll wait a little longer until you go check your eyes. No, it's not CGI. It's an optical illusion that shows how your brain differentiates different shades of color.

It works using the following techniques. First, there's “local contrast.” Basically, if a lighter color is surrounded by darker colors, your eye is naturally going to perceive it as lighter, and vice versa. So, the check you see as “dark” is surrounded by lighter colors, while the check you see as “light” is surrounded by darker colors.

Next there are the edges. The shadow has a soft edge that gradually fades to a much darker color, but the checks have sharp lines that are easy for your eye to see. Your eye tends to ignore light levels when figuring out color because it doesn't want to get misled by shadows. The sharp edges of the checks also announce to your mind that there is a sharp color change, right at that junction, so your mind sees what it expects to see.

It's incredibly freaky, but utterly awesome at the same time.

Source: YouTube/Brusspup

THE DAILY FOUR