11:00am
Cops O: Between a Bush and a Hard Place
11:30am
Cops O: Running in Traffic
12:00pm
Cops O: Too Many Cooks
12:30pm
Cops O: A Man Without a Plan
1:00pm
Cops O: Love Bites
1:30pm
Cops O: Strange Encounters
2:00pm
Cops O: Step Away from the Cutlery
8:30pm
Cops O: Between a Bush and a Hard Place
10:00pm
Cops O: Running in Traffic
10:30pm
Cops O: A Man Without a Plan
11:00pm
Cops O: Love Bites
11:30pm
Cops O: Strange Encounters
12:00am
Cops O: Too Many Cooks
12:30am
Cops O: Step Away from the Cutlery
2:00am
Jail: Las Vegas
2:30am
3:00am
3:30am
9:00am
Gangland: Most Notorious
10:00am
Gangland: To Torture or to Kill?
11:00am
Gangland: Killing Snitches
12:00pm
Gangland: Texas Terror
1:00pm
Gangland: The Death Head
2:00pm
Gangsters: America’s Most Evil : The Pot Princess of Beverly Hills: Lisette Lee
6:00pm
Cops O: Tell It To My Wife

Emily Wants to be a Real Girl

by Reverend_Danger   August 20, 2008 at 2:13PM  |  Views: 196

And she almost is. The guys that did the animation for GTA are pushing digital animation to a new, less cop-killing level with Emily.  She's a damn-near photorealistic creation that, they say, heralds a new era in film and gaming in which the lines between reality and unreality will be blurred.  Sound confusing? Hit the jump for the eerie, eerie details.

The technology is based on dozens and dozens of tiny calculations based on the human face.  The detail* they go into is staggering.  These calculations are possible because of a new chip, the Radeon HD 4870 X2, which can compute 2.4 teraflops per second.  Numbers are boring, though, what about the art of it?  Timesonline reports:

"Ninety per cent of the work is convincing people that the eyes are real," Mike Starkenburg, chief operating officer of Image Metrics, said.

"The subtlety of the timing of eye movements is a big one. People also have a natural asymmetry - for instance, in the muscles in the side of their face. Those types of imperfections aren't that significant but they are what makes people look real."  

The article goes on to say that practical applications of this technology to games and movies are a ways off (they estimate 2020), so don't get too excited for a real-live robotic Lara Croft just yet.  Until then, though, here's Emily: 

*Call me conservative, but putting an actor inside a giant metallic orb and firing 3,000 lights at him sounds needlessly more complicated than pointing one movie camera at him.  It also sounds less creepy.  Like, way less creepy.

 

THE DAILY FOUR