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The Auction Hunters Travel Deep Into Texas In Episode Ten

by MHofstatter   June 03, 2011 at 6:30PM  |  Views: 3,915
The stars at night are big and bright, deep in the heart of auction hunting. This week it was an all-new Auction Hunters, and in it Ton and Allen invaded the great state of Texas. Landing 200 miles north of Dallas, the Hunters were set to encounter the BIGGEST auction in the whole U.S. of A. Want to see how they did? Let's find out!



EVERYTHING'S BIGGER IN TEXAS

800 containers! That's what Ton and Allen were facing when they arrived at the North Texas storage facility. With auctioners coming in from all around the country to get in on a piece of the action, things were not going to be easy for our guys, then again -- they never are. When you add in a hunter who looks a little too much like a former president named "W," then this storage auction takes on a whole new life. Having so many units on the line, Ton and Allen were able to turn the tables and use it to their advantage by standing back and watching the competition in action. The first round yielded 20 auctions, during which W. just kept on bidding. He also kept winning. The Hunters certainly had some trouble on their hands with the presidential Texan, but with the 19th unit, Ton and Allen reached their limit. They saw a great unit with boxes of antique glass and they were not going to let this one get away. They didn't and ended up bagging it for a lean $575. With 780 units to go, how things were going to turn out was anyone's guess.

ah 213 guns


REPEATER RIFLE

Sold For: $3,350 (and a homemade lunch)

This week was the gun show for Ton and Allen as they uncovered a high-end over/under Browning shotgun with a gold-plated trigger, an automatic .20 gauge, a .357 Magnum, a Diamondback .38 special, and a Colt Python. Phew! That's a lot of guns. All brand new, in the box, and never shot. Of course, there was one gun in the unit that had been shot, well, about a hundred years ago that is. The dynamic duo found a .33 Winchester rifle, a "ranch" gun as it was often called. A favorite of Theodore Roosevelt's it had a lever-action which allowed it to work as a repeater (cock, shoot, cock, shoot) and possessed an add-on sight that allowed you to more accurately shoot as far as 500 yards. I think it's easy to see why it was Roosevelt's favorite. It's also easy to see why Ton and Allen were as excited as they were to find it!

ah 213 slot cars


VINTAGE SLOT CAR RACERS

Sold For: $2,000

This was an interesting find to say the least. Everyone loves toys, but these toys have value! After finding five slot car racers, two of which were in the box, along with the controllers, Ton and Allen were eager to figure out exactly what they had on their hands. How better to get an answer than to consult an expert? The guys headed over to a local hobbyist with a knack for the niche market of slot car racers. Needless to say their expert was impressed even coming across one of the most prized cars in the market, something he's never seen in his 30 years of collecting. To top it all off, the guys even had a BATMOBILE slot car. Nothing beats a Batmobile. The real question is: would they run? No, they didn't run, but they sure as heck could drive! Drive to the bank, that is.

Earlier this week on Facebook we threw up our weekly item matchup, pitting the set of antique slot cars against the repeater rifle. Our fans are usually spot on, but this week they picked the slot cars which were a far cry from the $3,350 that the gun brought in. No matter how you cut it, the slot cars or the rifle, the Hunters still came out HUGE.

This week was truly the week to end all weeks for Ton and Allen. They shelled out a costly $2,975 but that was for 11 units. As they always say, 80% the units fail to yield a return, so this time around it was definitely safety in numbers and what high numbers they were. The antique glass (or what later proved to be lead crystal) brought them $4,320, the vintage slot car racers drove in $2,000 and the assortment of guns raked in a massive $14,250. You add all that up and you get $20,570 minus the cost of the rooms for a grand total of . . . $17,595 take home! Wowza!

Auction Hunters is taking a short summer break. Have no fear, all new episodes will return to Spike later this summer. In the meantime, check out this week's episode, "Everything's Bigger In Texas," now available online. As always keep an eye on the Auction Hunters Facebook fan page for the latest news and updates. After all, we may have a few surprises in store for you.

THE DAILY FOUR

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